Share the joy
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Peter Matthews - Book Cover Author Image

 

Dr Peter D Matthews is the author of Shakespeare Exhumed: The Bassano Chronicles (2013) and Genesis of the Shakespearean Works (2017). Dr Matthews has forensically dated the majority of the Shakespearean plays twenty years before earlier scholars, such as Rowe, Malone and Chambers – some plays dated as early as 1561, 1559 and 1558 – up to six years before William Shakespeare was born. Dr Matthews’ exemplary philosophical dissertation of the Shakespearean works and its critics, reveals much about the identity of the real authors.

Dr Matthews is credited with  producing research that is ‘amongst the finest Shakespearean authorship research to date.’ He has immersed himself in the study of the ancients: building, architecture, history, literature, theology and philosophy, which culminated into being awarded a Doctorate Degree of Philosophy in 2001. His books reflect his passion, determination, with a hint of artistic eccentricity from his own life’s journey.

A little from Peter

Hi there. Welcome to my website. I was asked by my publisher to write a little about myself, specifically how I came to research the Shakespearean works. So here goes:

I must admit, it was not my lifelong dream to become a Shakespearean scholar, nor was any form of literature a passion of my youth. Although I descend from British lords, politicians, military commanders, and lawmen, contrasted against eminent philosophers, poets and sages, my tenth grade English teacher would attest to the fact that I barely passed her English class.

In fact, Ms Lait and I never really saw eye to eye on anything. She was well versed in the Shakespearean classics, but being the larrikin I was, I mistakenly believed such lyrical performances were pompous and of no earthly good to a young man growing up in a modern Australian macho culture. She scoffed at me, declaring I must recant or face no earthly pardon from this world, almost prophesying that it will not end well for me by attacking ‘the Bard’. Some thirty-five years later, upon reflection, I wish the words ‘never in a million years’ had not left my unfettered lips!

The one brief paper I remember writing that Ms Lait graded extremely well was my application of any chosen line by Othello upon my own character. Having compared me to a grain of sand, a niggly irritation that might cause her death, I chose the following canto from Act 5, Scene 2, Lines 2714-5 of Othello:

Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away

Richer than all his tribe.

Although the paper was to be at least 500 words, I simply wrote a brief piece of no more than 200 words illustrating how such a small grain of sand could have such a profound effect to cause such beauty to develop within. An infinitesimal grain of sand, barely seen by the naked eye, can be described as a reactive irritant to an old mollusc. So much so that it releases a crystalized substance called nacre, a strong resilience that rejects, almost repelling the grain of sand for its own self-preservation. Yet to the grain of sand, the nacre is but divine ambrosia, the breath of God that is perpetually forming wisdom and beauty within. Thus a mere grain of sand can develop into the finest pearl, citing poetry, or better still, a prophet to the people – feeding pearls to those in need within a darkened mollusc kingdom.

I was just trying to be witty! Yet unbeknown to me at the time, this old adage I flaunted at the age of thirteen is the rudimentary philosophy of the esoteric Jewish (particularly Essene) legend of Pardes – the quintessential Kabbalistic theology of Tzimtzum that was deliberately weaved throughout all of the Shakespearean works. Thus, I received top marks merely for being a smart aleck and just scraped through her class with a pass!

Throughout the past thirty-five years since that time, I have immersed myself in the study of the ancients: building, architecture, history, literature, theology and philosophy, which culminated into being awarded a Doctorate Degree of Philosophy in 2001. Little did I realize, this award was but my genesis – the beginning of rational thought and enlightenment! Having immersed myself amid innumerable Shakespearean imageries and the mysteries of Kabbalah, I discovered the two are synonymous. One cannot simply read the Shakespearean works without the study of these ancient esoteric Hebrew principles. Each play was deliberately embellished with Hebrew piyyut (embellished poetry used as poetic song in worship on Sabbaths and festivals), Jewish (particularly Essene) theology, and Kabbalistic lore from the Sefer Yetzirah, the Babylonian Talmud, and the first Zohar of Mantua printed by members of the Bassano family – just to name a few.

Why not keep abreast of my research by monitoring my blog or on academia for snippets?